The following trainings have been approved to meet the Health, Safety and Nutrition requirements in the CCDF Plan.

Other courses offered by SWCDC  may meet the requirement, a course description must be provided to your licensing consultant for approval. 

 

Click HERE to return to the calendar to register.

 

The required categories for Health Safety and Nutrition trainings are also listed below.  Southwestern will continue to add and update our trainings to meet this requirement as well as to educate and inform early childhood professionals on essential topics to provide high quality care for the children they serve.  Please continue to check back or contact us for additional topics! 

Online-Self Paced/On demand Trainings:

1. Children's Health and Safety Essentials (CHASE) (approved to meet to following 6 CCDF Health and Safety topic areas: 1.Prevention and control of infectious diseases, including immunization; 2.Administration of medication, with standards for parental consent; 3.Building and physical premises safety, including identification of and protection from hazards that can cause bodily injury such as electrical hazards, bodies of water, and vehicular traffic; 4.Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies resulting from a natural disaster, or a man-caused event; 5.Precautions in transporting children, if applicable; 6.Hazardous materials storage)

Children’s Health and Safety Essentials (CHASE) is a combination of multiple health and safety topics that are required by the Child Care and Development Fund and is also a great training for newly hired staff as they complete employee orientation training as it covers the foundations of safety, health and care of all children in early education settings such as active supervision, indoor and outdoor spaces, handwashing and table washing, sanitation concerns, prevention and control of communicable diseases, responding to emergency situations, transportation safety, hazardous materials and their storage, creating a first aid kit, choking hazards, allergies, and medication administration. This is a great refresher course for all staff and it will help new hires become acquainted with the facility and facility policies. Enroll today to embark or continue your journey into providing high quality care as an early learning professional!

 

2. Nuts, Trees & Bees..Oh My! Allergens in Early Care and Education (approved to meet Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and allergic reactions)

Food allergies and anaphylaxis  are a growing safety and concern that affects children and adults.  How many individuals do you know with some type of allergy?  What medications and precautions do they need to handle their allergic reactions? Although the number of children with food allergies may seem small in just one setting, an allergic reaction can be life threatening and have far-reaching effects on children and their families. What will you do if a child accidentally eats a food allergen while in your care? Being proactive and prepared for such an occurrence creates a safer, calmer, and higher quality environment than being reactive and unprepared! 

 

3. Eww...The Flu! (approved to meet Prevention and control of infectious diseases; including immunizations) 

 Eww!! The flu! No one wants to get the flu.  Do you get a flu shot (influenza vaccine) to help prevent keeping yourself from getting the flu each year?  That can often be a controversial question.  How old does a child need to be in order to receive a vaccination for influenza?  Among children, influenza vaccination remains especially important for those younger than 5 years of age and those of any age with an underlying chronic medical condition such as asthma, juvenile diabetes, cardiac disease, immunosuppression, or neurologic disorders. These children are at higher risk of serious complications if they get the flu. 
Participants attending this learning event will be able to identify signs and symptoms of influenza, describe how influenza is transmitted, and list strategies for prevention and control of influenza in early care and education environments

 

4. Shaking Hurts: Abusive Head Trauma (approved to meet Prevention of shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma, and child maltreatment)

Abusive Head Trauma or Shaken Baby Syndrome is the leading cause of death in cases of child abuse in the United States.  Do you know why and how these injuries occur?  This learning event will provide a definition of abusive head trauma along with the immediate symptoms and long-term effects of shaken baby syndrome.  Participants who attend this event will also be able to list strategies to decrease the risk of shaken baby syndrome in an early education environment as well as communicate the danger of shaken baby syndrome to parents with accompanying strategies to reduce the risk to their children.

 

5. Nitpicking:Head Lice Helpline (approved to meet Prevention and control of infectious diseases; including immunizations)

Does the thought of head lice make you itch and scratch?  Of course, it does!  Are you aware that the American Academy of Pediatrics has some new recommendations as of 2016 regarding the exclusion of children with nits from schools?  Does everyone with head lice experience symptoms?  Families and children experiencing head lice as well as classrooms need support along with treatment options that dispel the myths and misconceptions regarding head lice.  Attend this learning event to help support children, families, and classrooms and stop the nitpicking!

 

6. Zero in on Zika Virus (approved to meet Prevention and control of infectious diseases; including immunizations)

Let’s face it, all diseases can be a little bit frightening. You hear it on the news, so do children who happen to be nearby and that can be even more frightening.  Does the Center for Disease Control have a registry for pregnant women?  What are the effects of Zika virus on unborn babies or is it too early to know?    If we feel anxious as adults, imagine how children must feel.  Overwhelmed, scared and confused, just to name a few!  Children can often be scared to ask questions or perhaps do not know the questions to ask and the terminology used may often be medical terms and hard to comprehend.   Together, as early education professionals, we can work with families and children to help children alleviate their fears and anxieties by first truly understanding the situation and terminology ourselves and then helping children talk through the situation.

 

7. Up in Smoke (approved to meet Building and physical premises safety, including identification of and protection from hazards that can cause bodily injury such as electrical hazards, bodies of water, and vehicular traffic)

Health Consequences of Smoking, Vaping, and Air Quality on the Human Body.
E-cigarette use among youth and young adults has become a public health concern.
E-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youth, surpassing conventional cigarettes. Are e-cigarettes safer than conventional cigarettes? How exactly does an e-cigarette work? Is it legal for a teen to use an e-cigarette? Why would someone choose to vape rather than smoke a traditional cigarette? Smoking is now prohibited on the premises of a child care center in North Carolina and e-cigarettes have been added to the smoking restrictions for staff. Attend this training to distinguish between second and third hand smoke, their affects on air quality, describe how an e-cigarette works and the dangers of smoking e-cigarettes.

 

8.  BSAC- BSAC School Age Care (meets the 5 following topic areas Prevention and control of infectious diseases, including immunization; Administration of medication, with standards for parental consent; Building and physical premises safety, including identification of and protection from hazards that can cause bodily injury such as electrical hazards, bodies of water, and vehicular traffic; Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies resulting from a natural disaster, or a man-caused event; (not the required EPR training); and Precautions in transporting children, if applicable)

BSAC (Basic School Age Care) is a 5 hour introductory level training event for school age care professionals that are new to the field. The training includes the following modules: 1) Health, Safety, & Nutrition,2) Environmental Design, 3) Child/Youth Development 4) Developmentally Appropriate Activities, 5) Guiding Child Behavior, and 6) Quality School Age Care. This training in required by the NC Division of Child Development and Early Education for school age care professionals working in licensed programs but is a great training for new staff in any afterschool program setting.

 

9.  From Nosebleeds to Needle Sticks: Encounters with Bloodborne Pathogens (meets the requirements for the following topic areas: Handling and storage of hazardous materials including biocontaminants and Prevention and control of infectious diseases, including immunization; Administration of medication, with standards for parental consent)

 

 Coming soon are the following topics to meet the following areas:

  • Please look for additional topics coming soon!

 

Face to Face/In Person Trainings

1. Emergency Preparedness and Response in Child Care (approved to meet Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies resulting from a natural disaster, or man cause event). 

The new Emergency Preparedness & Response (EPR) in Child Care Training gives early educators information and tools to prepare for many types of emergencies.  The EPR in Child Care Training addresses new NC Child Care Rules on emergency preparedness, current best practice recommendations, and guidance on completing the online EPR plan.  The EPR Plan template is found on the North Carolina Emergency Management website.   

 

2. ITS-SIDS (approved to meet prevention of sudden infant death syndrome and use of safe sleeping practices.)

 

3. Infant-Toddler Zone (approved to meet building and physical premises safety, including identification and protection from hazards) Anyone who has cared for infants and toddlers knows how challenging it can be. The module contains guidelines for care givers of very young children. It describes procedures for ensuring supervision, proper guidance, and planning a safe environment.  

 

4. Get Ready, Get Set Go! Field Trip & Transportation Safety (approved to meet precautions in transporting children, if applicable)  Would you like to know how to keep children safe during daily routine transportation or on field trips? This module contains guidelines for appropriate supervision, accurate attendance taking, vehicle inspections and much more.

 

5.  Beyond Bandaids (approved to meet administration of medication) It’s a fact of life that children at home or in child care will become sick, get hurt, or need to take medicine. Dealing with these situations safely is a serious task. This module contains guidelines for responding appropriately to accidents and illness. It also describes careful procedures for administering medication.

 

Required topic areas:

  • Prevention and control of infectious diseases, including immunization;
  • Administration of medication, with standards for parental consent;
  • Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and allergic reactions;
  • Building and physical premises safety, including identification of and protection from hazards that can cause bodily injury such as electrical hazards, bodies of water, and vehicular traffic;
  • Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies resulting from a natural disaster, or a man-caused event;
  • Handling and storage of hazardous materials and the appropriate disposal of biocontaminants;
  • Precautions in transporting children, if applicable;
  • Prevention of shaken baby syndrome and abusive head trauma
  • CPR and First Aid
  • "Recognizing and Responding to Suspicions of Child Maltreatment" as required in Rule .0705(g)
  • Prevention of sudden infant death syndrome and use of safe sleeping practices.