Month
Date
Upcoming Event
Human Biology for the Social Sciences Prerequisite Course
This online course is available for students admitted to a social work program or any other program in which you may need a Biology prerequisite course. It is recommended that non-UofL Students obtain prior approval that these courses meet the criteria of your institution before completing your registration.
Statistics for the Social Sciences Prerequisite Course
This online course is available for students admitted to a social work program or any other program in which you may need a Statistics prerequisite course. It is recommended that non-UofL Students obtain prior approval that these courses meet the criteria of your institution before completing your registration.
Research Methods for Social Work Prerequisite Course
This online course is available for students admitted to a social work program or any other program in which you may need a Research Methods prerequisite course. It is recommended that non-UofL Students obtain prior approval that these courses meet the criteria of your institution before completing your registration.
December
12/6/2019
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Mindfulness seminar
Emerging from meditative and contemplative traditions, mindfulness is increasingly used in Western psychology and medicine to alleviate an array of conditions. Mindfulness practices can help across a wide spectrum of issues from relationships issues, health issues, workplace effectiveness and reducing anxiety and depression. With the increased pace and often conflicting demands of practicing in the field of Mental Health we are subject to the effects of internal and external stress. Mounting evidence shows that mindfulness practice can reduce job burnout, anxiety, depression and stress, improve focus and empathy, and increase well-being for practitioner and patient alike. It can also provide an excellent conduit for self-care which has become a necessity and requirement for practicing in the field of Mental health, Social Work and Psychology. This workshop will provide a conceptual framework for mindfulness, a variety of tools and techniques for mindfulness practice, along with ample time for guided mindfulness practices, dialogue and Q&A. Therapists, Psychologists and Case Managers alike are welcome, including those new to the field.
January
1/9/2020
12:00 PM to 1/11/2020 8:00 PM
Our Whole Lives (OWL) Sex Ed Facilitator training
Honest, accurate information about sexuality changes lives. It dismantles stereotypes and assumptions, builds self-acceptance and self-esteem, fosters healthy relationships, improves decision making, and has the potential to save lives. The OWL facilitator training provides accurate, developmentally appropriate information about a range of topics, including relationships, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual health, and cultural influences on sexuality. Additionally, it offers participants the opportunity to learn how to facilitate some of the most challenging topics with confidence and ease, a highly sought after skill in any career. Our Whole Lives was developed jointly by the Unitarian Universalist Association and United Church of Christ and is used in faith communities as well as by public, charter, and private schools; after-school programs; youth groups; home schools; colleges; correctional facilities; and groups in other settings. Although developed by two religious organizations, Our Whole Lives contains no religious references or doctrine. Our Whole Lives recognizes and respects the diversity of participants with respect to biological sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and disability status. The activities and language used throughout the program have been carefully chosen to be as inclusive as possible of this human diversity.
1/24/2020
9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Healing Our Trauma: Impact and Interventions for People of Color
Many people are aware of the ground-breaking research around the relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) to adult health outcomes. Childhood trauma is now considered the leading determinate of the health and well-being of our nation, and our work is being shaped into trauma informed approaches. However, the original CDC-Kaiser Permanente study that led to our current understanding and framing of Adverse Childhood Experiences focused only on ten types of family trauma and their impact on a largely white, middle income population. What about other types of trauma, specifically trauma that impacts people and communities of color? How can our trauma informed responses be culturally competent, based on an understanding of racial trauma? This workshop will first present an overview of the original ten Adverse Childhood Experiences, including how trauma impacts the brain and behavior, increasing the likelihood of the ten most common causes of death in the United States. The traditional Trauma Informed Approach will also be discussed. We will then focus on the multiple types of trauma that impact people and communities of color, with a focus on the African American population. We’ll explore culturally competent, trauma informed methods of healing and have an opportunity to discuss resources available in the Louisville community. Target Audience: Anyone who works with people or communities of color either in micro, mezzo or macro work.